Monday, February 9, 2015

The Exotic Arctic Marble Fox

The coloration of the Arctic Marble Fox is not something which occurs in nature but is acquired from human intervention and the kits are born in captivity. Marble foxes occur as genetic mutations, called color phases, resulting from breeding the red fox. Their beautiful white fur displays patches of black or tan across the face and on the ears. The Fur Commission USA also reports that an “arctic marble” was born in a silver fox litter in Norway in 1945 at Sverre Omber’s farm.



Ozzie
Black Pine Animal Sanctuary
Photo:  Karine Aigner



Ozzie, in the photo above, was rescued by the Black Pine Animal Sanctuary after being left on the front porch of a home in Indiana without care. He was only about six months of age and had already lived a number of different places.



YouTube





Arctic Marble Fox
Bored Panda
Photo:  Ewald Mario
While exotic animals have become favorites to own, research and education on the species you wish to acquire is the very first step. Living with and caring for a fox is very different than owning a cat or dog. Check first to determine if owning a fox is legal in your state. We had sugar gliders for a number of years, and discovered that it is not legal in every state to have a sugar glider living in your home. Learn the facts about the fox or any exotic animal before you make that purchase.





Daryl Dee
Sibil's Den
Do your research to find reputable dealers. As with all breeders/dealers, some are just in it for the money without respect to the animal or its welfare.  Foxes are not going to
thrive while living in a house on a full-time basis. They are outdoor animals and also need an outdoor environment in which to feel at home. Their life span is typically 10 to 15 years in captivity and they will weigh anywhere from 6 to 20 pounds. The first six months of a fox kit's life is the ideal time to develop bonding. Foxes need activity and attention to avoid boredom as a bored fox will find something to do and it will probably tend toward being more destructive. Diet for a fox can include beef, venison, poultry, fruit, vegetables, and dog food. Concern has to be given to other animals you may have. Dogs and foxes tend to get along very well, but cat's and foxes are not a good mix. When adding another kit to mix, it is best to monitor any activity between the two until the kit becomes older. Litter box training can take longer with some foxes than others, but persistence is the key to success. Unless you plan on breeding your fox, spaying/neutering will diminish some of odor arising from their marking. They will continue to mark their territory even after spaying/neutering.




Kenti
JPGMAG
Photo/story: Kimberly Deverell



If you are considering a fox as a future pet, visit Sybil’s Den for the Red Fox Family Care Sheet (Silver fox, Marble Fox, Glazier Fox, Pearl Fox) to begin the journey with information on purchasing, environment, young kits, training, spaying/neutering, scent glands, feeding and breeders.




Talk to others who have or have had a fox as a pet to determine what is actually needed to care for one of these amazing creatures. Hearing from someone who has lived that life, will help you decide if you are ready for this new experience.





What exotic animal have you ever had as a pet?





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Thursday, February 5, 2015

Whole Foods Market Recalls Raw Macadamia Nuts Due To Possible Health Risk

February 3, 2015


Distributed in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee



Whole Foods Market is recalling packaged raw macadamia nuts due to possible Salmonella contamination. Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.








The product was labeled as “Whole Foods Market Raw Macadamia Nuts" and was packaged in 5.6 oz. plastic tubs. If you believe you have purchased these macadamia nuts, visit the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for package labels, dates, batch numbers, and UPC codes to identify the recalled products. The recalled product was distributed to Whole Foods Market, Greenlife Grocery, and Harry’s Farmer Market stores in the states listed above.


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